Description

I had posted a version of this PC a little bit ago, but I've made some changes to it, taken some more/slightly better pictures and wanted to give people a better look.

This build was a project over the summer to build a small, portable, PC. It originally started in a Node 202, but that was too heavy and still felt big. The Lian-Li, despite being technically "bigger" by volume, feels much smaller and due to it's aluminum build is so much lighter. It actually feels portable.

The 1600x was one of the first parts I bought, and probably not the most optimal choice for a build this small given it's 95w TDP. I tried several cooling solutions to tame it. The Noctua L9i and Cryorig C7 weren't able to keep it from throttling with any fan config. But the H60 works perfectly. It keeps temps in the 30's idling and under 60 at load.

The 1070 is the most recent addition and it fits perfectly. It does get pretty warm, and caps out at 82, losing a bit of its boost. But that's probably more the fault of the airflow in the case then the card. I may mod some vents into the bottom of the case in the future to give the GPU a bit more air.

I'm pretty pleased with the total package and the way it turned out. Everything packs up into the Ape Case bag and the Tusko gives the monitor a shoulder strap which makes the whole outfit super portable.

Comments

  • 22 months ago
  • 3 points

Great!

Just underclock/undervolt the GPU and the temps will be ok.

Cheers.

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

Gigabyte is releasing an ITX 1080 soon, (Valve time) so when that comes out I'd like to see a ITX sized 1080 in this build. I don't believe the Zotac Mini 1080 would fit inside this build, but the Gigabyte one would.

I agree that there needs to be more ventilation for the GPU, so a cutout to add a 120mm slim fan wouldn't be out of the question. Heck, you can take the fan off the GPU and use slim 120mm fans to directly cool the GPU with fresh cold air from outside that way.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I checked around for that 1080 to see if it would be worth it to wait around. But I couldn't find it in the US anywhere and the price I was seeing overseas when converted made it look like it would be super pricey even if I could find it, so when I saw a decent price on the 1070 I went for it. Also the Gigabyte cooler is supposed to be a fair bit worse then the MSI one.

I have seen a few builds in this case using those Zotac cards that are around ~210mm, but for me that would mean losing the H60 and probably the front USB as well.

I may cut a hole to line up with the MSI's fan. That would be a good solution I think. The fan is 92mm, and moves a fair bit of air. So I don't think I would need anything below it, just a bit more access to fresh air.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

The Zotac with the heatsink fins cut off at the end of the card (LTT did this trick) and a 120mm fan blowing onto the card resulted in good thermals. All you need to be careful with is not cutting the copper heatpipe, but you can make the Zotac fit if you take off the stock fans and use 120mm fans instead to blow onto the card. You just leave the heatsink fins bare.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

A lot of people with this case (myself included) recommend cutting holes at the bottom to fit 2 92mm fans for intake.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Gigabyte Itx 1080 has very small holes on gpu support backet and the same cooler of the 1070 one, that generates already high temperatures and a lot of noise. It will be a nice GPU but I don't want a furnace/samwill in my m-itx rig.

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

In that case, the Zotac one with a 120mm fan blowing onto the bare fins would work better I guess.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, but many Zotac mini have coil whine.

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

This must be among the finest cable mgmt ever done inside closed case. You HAVE to install a window in there. The yellow details also look so good...

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

Good to see the little Lian Li back again here. I had two of those and had to ditch them because the ZOTAC GTX1080Mini wouldn't fit. Now that the 1080 ITX by GIGABYTE is out, I'm reconsidering buying this case again and trying one more time... Have my +1.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I currently have the Zotac 1080 mini in my Lian Li case. It's a VERY tight fit, but you can still have the front USB IO (it requires a bit of flexing).

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

You should try the ID-Cooling IS-60

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah maybe, that wasn't an AM4 option last year when I built this. I think at 55mm it's too tall by a mm or two, I'd have to verify. But that's right at the limit.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

The cooler is 55mm tall and max cooler height listed on Lian Li is 60MM, you should be good to go unless Lian Li is lying on the specs.

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey! I'm building my first PC and I'm starting with the TU-100. Your build is a huge inspiration for me & I'll be getting many similar components. Except I'll be using Ryzen 5 2600 and Radeon RX570 mini.

Right now I'm stuck on trying to decide the right cooling solution. Could you help me out?

I understand you were using Noctua L9i to cool your CPU before you built in the water cooler. What kind of temperatures were you getting? Was it just the CPU that was too hot, or did switching to the water cooler improve the entire 'ambience' inside the case?

.. you've also mentioned in a comment that you set your cooler fans to INTAKE. Doesn't that mean that all the heat from the CPU gets blown into the case, rather than out of it? Was this a kind of "I don't like it, but it has to be like that" situation, or is this a legitimate way of setting up water cooling in an ITX build?

.. Lastly, what is the function of the yellow Noctua fan on top of the water cooler? Just pulling in more cold air from the outside? Or is it for dispersing the heat from the radiator?

Hoping to hear from you & thanks in advance!!

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Follow up question: did you drill that horizontal bar of holes into the case which is visible on the first picture?

It looks super professional! So much so that I thought that this was a standard feature of the case!!

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for your nice comments, I wish I could take credit for that. But the case came with that.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, sorry for the slow response.

The L9i couldn't cool the 95w Ryzen chip, the temps were way too high, it was throttling. That's why I went with the water cooler. Where your chip is 65w you may have more luck with it then I did. But the H60 (and specifically the H60 because most other coolers are too thick) is a really nice option that does a good job.

The biggest flaw with the TU-100 is the lack of fan mount options. There is no space in a unmodded TU-100 for a fan in front of the water cooler. The Noctua fan you see is the only fan in the case (apart from the PSU and GPU fans). It has to go on that side because otherwise the radiator interferes with the motherboard. That fan is set to "intake". So it is sucking air over the radiator for the CPU and then spitting it out. It's true this is "warm" air. But it's preferable to pushing warm air out and relying on negative pressure to bring in new air imo. If I want to make any mods to this case, and I may eventually, I would drill vents along the bottom to give the GPU access to its own air. That's something the case really needs.

Hope that helps. Enjoy your build. It's a fun little case.

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for taking the time to reply! Your comments are really useful and they are helping my thinking a lot.

I'm still saving up money to buy all the components & it may take a few months before I have everything. However the first (and only!) thing that I bought so far is the case, because I'm worried it might disappear from the market :). It will arrive next week & I really hope has it has the horizontal air grill, like your one, because apparently not every TU100 has it.

--

While looking at your pictures I noticed that you are not using your DVD tray.. and that you actually have some space at the top of your case (above your PSU).

This got me thinking: since hot air rises to the top, wouldn't it be cool to suck it up at the top of the case and spit it out through the dvd slot in the front?

In fact: there already exist DVD drive coolers on Amazon, which were created for laptops. However, they have really tiny fans and I'm thinking of building an air vent with a proper 12 mm fan :D

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

A slot cooler would be interesting. Unfortunately the drive "cage" part is what holds the faceplate in so you either have to leave that on or mod the faceplate somehow. If I expanded the storage past the 256gb in the WD drive I would use the drive case, it is kinda out of the way.

I did try mounting 2 slim Noctua 92x15mm fans to the side panel along the holes, at one point to draw more air in. But I didn't find that changed much. I also tried using one of Noctuas 140mm fans with 120mm mounting holes, the Noctua NF-A15 HS-PWM chromax, and that didn't fit with the water cooler either. I'm a bit of a fan slut, so I've tried just about every non-modded config I could think of. The 3000rpm fan on the AIO cooler was the best.

The case is fun to build in! It feels real nostalgic to me, has that LAN Party vibe that I loved in highschool. Reminds me of the first PC I built which used a DFI Lanparty board that had slots that glowed under cathode ray tubes and had a super OC'd CPU haha.

Enjoy your build! mITX builds are the most fun imo!

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

That build, if it wasn't made for being portable, should have a glass side panel if looks so amazing.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, great looking build! I'm considering this case for a similar build with an AIO CPU cooler. My plan for the GPU is to drill some holes in the bottom for some air-flow (if that's not enough maybe a fan down there too.

What i was wondering was what orientation do you have the fan for the AIO? Is it exhausting or intaking through the front?

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, thanks for the comment. I've thought of drilling a hole for the GPU as well, I'm sure that would help a lot.

The AIO fan is set as an intake.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! It's a great case to build in. It's not very complicated inside, basically just an aluminum frame, the only thing I really did to it was remove the 2.5 drive mounts since I'm not using any. The biggest drawback is probably the single 120mm fan mount. It would be nice if the bottom was vented with a fan mount or something. You're limited as well with GPU length. There are a few people who have fit some of the 210mm GPUs in there, but I don't think I'd want anything bigger then this 1070. The short PSU cables helped a lot as well. It was much more cluttered with the stock SF450 cables.