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Upgrading CPU i5-9400F vs Ryzen 5 2600

exon654

1 month ago

I'm planning to upgrade my old CPU (i5-4430) , and need your opinions on how to spend my cash better. I've made a few builds ,so please take a look at that.

Build with Ryzen https://pcpartpicker.com/list/7NxGQZ

Build with Intel https://pcpartpicker.com/list/dmRJKB

Please bear in mind that I'm only buying a new CPU/Motherboard/RAM also maybe a new PSU which have been listed in those builds. About PSU.. I currently have some no name PSU (Logic 600) that has 580W, so would I need a new one or the current would be okay? I think wattage is more than enough it's just the brand that I do not trust. However I have a very tight budget 350-400€ and I wouldn't be able to afford a decent PSU, Id then rather get 2600X instead of a new PSU.

I can't decide whether I should go Ryzen or Intel. I'm more interested in intel because it has a better single thread performance and overall better performance in gaming which is all I care about.

By the way this is a photo of my PSU (can't find specs of it on the internet) https://gyazo.com/ad514337561c74907bbd70d55a980836

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 4 points

Hi Exon,

If funds are tight, have you considered just upgrading the CPU on your existing computer? A 4790 or E3-1231 V3 or something along those lines would give you both more clock speed and hyper-threading, likely enough computing power to "tide" the build over a couple more years for a better upgrade later.

  • 29 days ago
  • 1 point

Xeon E3-1231

It only took me 5 months to find someone recommending a xeon.

  • 1 month ago
  • 3 points

You can't go wrong with either of them

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

what about PSU? Should I get a better one?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

If all you care about it is gaming, there is very little reason to not buy Intel.

[comment deleted]
  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

They're about $10 apart right now, and the motherboards OP selected are also about $10 apart.

$20 more for what could be a 10-15% gap in gaming performance is pretty good.

If OP was doing anything else in addition to gaming, I'd recommend Ryzen though just because it's a much better all-rounder CPU.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Also I wanted to ask as I do not quite understand.

If my motherboard and CPU supports 2666Mhz , there's no point in buying higher speeds like 3000 , 3200 right?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

a B450 chipset board will support ram higher than 2666 and Ryzen does scale some with ram speed. Intel does not scale as much as AMD but the current locked intel chipsets supports 2666. If you put in a 3000 kit on said Intel board it will run at 2666 but it will still run fine. That is important info because ram prices fluctuate and sometimes you may find higher speed ram cheaper than the lower speed (comparing 3000 to 2666). Usually 3200 will cost more than 2666 99.9% of the time.

Both the AMD and Intel systems you listed should perform very close to each other in performance. Close enough that you may not be able to tell them apart in a blind side by side test.

Now a logic600 PSU is the sort of PSU I would avoid especially if it is old. Though do not rule out a decent brand 500w PSU if you want to save money as your parts likely won't come anywhere near that in actual power draw.

[comment deleted]
  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Rather then go for the 2600 which really is only good at being okay at everything I would double down on strengths rather then mediocrity.

Either Cores.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3 GHz 8-Core Processor $159.40 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $69.99 @ Amazon
Memory Patriot - Viper 4 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $87.99 @ Amazon
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $65.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES.3 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $39.95 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB WINDFORCE OC 6G Video Card -
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $483.31
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-20 20:02 EDT-0400

Or Gaming Performance.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $174.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory ADATA - XPG GAMMIX D10 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $75.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $65.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES.3 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $39.95 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB WINDFORCE OC 6G Video Card -
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $500.79
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-20 20:03 EDT-0400

The PSU in Your builds isn't reviewed yet so I would avoid, and the 250gb SSD and WD Black are overpriced, You can fit double the storage space in SSD and a 1tb with a much larger cache for roughly the same money.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Probably didnt explain clearly enough. I already have this SSD/HDD/GPU installed on my computer. I just paired new CPU, mobo and RAM to see if they would work together.

Also what do I need to know before I put these 3 new parts into my pc? I will need to reinstall windows probably, but what else? I've changed GPU but nothing else.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Do the fresh install otherwise You have all the older drivers hanging around which is asking for trouble.

Other then that shouldn't be much other then enabling the XMP profile to get the memory running at full speed.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Alright, thank you.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Rather then go for the 2600 which really is only good at being okay at everything I would double down on strengths rather then mediocrity.

The 2600 gets slightly better gaming and better performance with more lightly threaded workloads then the 1700. So unless someone is going to make use of the extra cores the 2600 is the better option.

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Overclock the 1700 (Comes with a better cooler anyway) and the 2600's advantage in less-threaded workloads largely dissolves into meaninglessness, while the 1700 has more on tap for streaming or other background tasks.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

If you can get the 1700 to 3.7 with the stock cooler (3.7 is the 2600 all core boost I believe).

  • 1 month ago
  • 0 points

The break even point is actually lower since the 1700 has more cores to offload threads onto.

Even in a biased review the difference between a 2600X and a 1700 is very small in gaming performance.

Biased part.

we didn’t hamper the 2600X when it came to memory. Instead we paired it with a 16GB DDR4-3400 CL16 kit. The R7 1700 was limited to 16GB DDR4-2933 memory with CL15 timings.

Performance outcome.

When we saw a difference, the 2600X was leading the way in every single instance, though usually the delta was limited to a 5 to 10% margin.

https://www.techspot.com/review/1825-ryzen-2600x-vs-1700/

They also covered the 2600X and 9400F.

With the advantage of faster DDR4-3400 memory, remember the 2600X isn’t artificially limited, it was able to match the Core i5-9400F using DDR4-2666 memory

https://www.techspot.com/review/1829-intel-core-i5-9400f-vs-amd-ryzen-5-2600x/

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Even in a biased review the difference between a 2600X and a 1700 is very small in gaming performance.

It wasn't bias, it just that there 1700 would not run with the higher clocked memory. One of the benefits of a Zen+ CPU. Oh and from the article...

Even in a biased review the difference between a 2600X and a 1700 is very small in gaming performance.

As for the 2600X vs the 9400F, again from the very article you posted.

For general computing the Ryzen 5 2600X can take advantage of multi-threading capabilities and will be considerably faster than the 9400F on heavy application workloads. Remember the 9400F is only marginally faster than the 8400, so you can safely use the older model as a measuring stick. For rendering and encoding workloads the 2600X is anywhere from 30 to 50% faster.

For those wondering about operating temperatures, using the box coolers both CPUs run at a little over 70 degrees with an ambient room temperature of 21 degrees. However where AMD's Wraith Spire is whisper quiet in our Blender stress test, the Intel box cooler sounds like a jet engine when paired with the 9400F. Therefore, you’ll want to spend at least another $25 on a decent cooler to make the thing bearable.

If you're mostly playing games on your PC, you will be happy buying either processor. Both proved to be solid options and are evenly matched with a slight advantage to the Intel chip if you don't tune up the Ryzen processor. The base performance we showed for the i5-9400F can be achieved with $90 memory, while the 2600X will require $110 - $120 memory in order to enable the frame rates shown here. It’s not a big cost difference and right now with anything less than an RTX 2070 or Vega 64 you’ll more than likely become GPU limited.

So unless you are going for high refresh gaming, the Ryzen CPUs are better choices as you will not notice a difference in gaming but see a big difference in just about everything else.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

2600 offers no advantages between those builds as stated other then being mediocre.

1700 is better if they can use the cores.

9400F is better for pure gaming performance.

So as stated they build arounds strengths rather then being "Okay" but second rate in both cases.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

When gaming the 2600 do perform slightly better than the 1700 and he is only interested in gaming. Intel would ofc be the best though...

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

When gaming the 2600 do perform slightly better than the 1700 and he is only interested in gaming.

Only at stock settings.

1700 has overclocking headroom left on its stock cooler without resorting to cranking the fan to max negating the advantages of the 2600 in gaming well costing less and mild overclocks like that don't need an expensive overclocking setup.

If We add aftermarket cooling, a good overclocking board, and high speed low latency RAM to the 2600 it can close the distance with the 9400F at a higher cost.

With the current pricing the 2600 has No advantages unlike both the 1700 and 9400F. Six threads or under heavily used the 9400F is better, Over Six threads and even though the 1700 is 3% slower clock for clock You are using more actual cores not virtual cores to run the workloads and it scales better.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Some times "Okay" is the best position. The the 2600 is able to do more then the 9400F, such as streaming, but had better gaming performance then the 1700, which is only better if all those threads are going to be used.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

1700 is better anytime you are engaging more then six threads, costs less, and comes with the better cooler.

9400F is better anytime you are engaging six or less threads.

Giving the current prices AMD has invalidated the 2600. It doesn't multi thread better then the 1700, and doesn't handle low thread usage as well as the 9400F. The only thing it does is be poorer at everything then both of the other options.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Can you also tell me are those PSU's trustable? Worth getting? Overall how is Seasonic brand, does it have good reputation?

https://www.amazon.com/Seasonic-S12II-620-SS-620GB-Capacitor/dp/B003BIEOCI https://www.amazon.com/Seasonic-S12II-520-SS-520GB-Capacitor/dp/B00390P1NO

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Ignore branding and focus on the specific units quality.

Those are a perfect example Seasonic has a good name but those are 8-9 year old units that were meh back then and now don't even meet current protection standards.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

It would be better if I get CX 550M or CX 550 I guess.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Those are better units in pretty much every way then the old Seasonics.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Just make a list from your existing build setup.

Making two builds without knowing which parts you already have that can be salvaged, doesn't help much.

And yes you must definitely change that ancient PSU.

I currently have some no name PSU (Logic 600) that has 580W,

It does have a max wattage output of 400 Watts on the 12V rail.

That shows that this unit is even worse than any decent group regulated unit that you could potentially use.

[comment deleted]
  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I'm not upgrading my GPU, at least for now it is still enough for 1080p60fps at decent settings.

[comment deleted]

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