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High air flow

ktran714

23 days ago

What rate is considered to be "high" air flow?

Comments

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

I am sorry but this question seems a bit vague. Are you referring to case fans as some are air flow design and others static pressure design or somewhere in between? Or referring to which cases might offer high airflow for better cooling?

For fans it is basically the wider the fan fins the more static pressure it may possibly have. There is some variation in that but that will give you a general idea.

For cases look up gamers nexus on youtube and see if they have reviewed that case. If they have they usually show how effective a case can be with its cooling potential.

  • 22 days ago
  • 1 point

Yeah I meant for the non-static pressure fans. The ones that just have air flow.

  • 22 days ago
  • 0 points

Well it really depends on how the fan will be used for which one is right for the job. If the fan is located at the back or front of the case and there is nothing really to interfere with airflow (HDD bays/restrictive front intake/dense dust filters) then an airflow fan would be the best bet. If it has to push through stuff or be used on a radiator it is suggested to use a fan that has a stronger pressure to be able to get more air through.

Here are a few videos that may help explain it a bit better:

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

Well I don't have a specific number for you. And I'm not sure I'd trust anyone's made up numbers as "high air flow" isn't a standardized defined value. It's marketing, and no one wants low air flow, or medium airflow when they could have high air flow. So it ends up being crazy making for a lot of people.

  1. Cases a lot have like 4 to 40 fan mounts.
  2. So fans must be really really important, because why would we have so many fan mounts if you didn't need them?
  3. So I need to put as many fans in my case as it will hold
  4. But other cases might allow for more fans/bigger fans, so is my case actually good enough? Or do I really need 140mm vs 120mm?

And on and on the mental gymnastics go. If you've got a decent case with a couple of fans a few more fans, or a slightly different configuration isn't going to make a difference. You won't be in a situation where if only you had more fans or a different case it would solve all your problems, or you'd give you kingdom for a few more CFM of airflow.

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

High flow is simply more air moving though it and taking more heat away with it. The idea with more case fans is they can run slow and quiet and you get more flow with more of them. The idea same with 140 fans will move more air quietly than same 120 fan. How many you really need depends on how much you OC, size of case and gpu card, if you run radiators that blow out or in, etc. There are normal case fans, then there are high pressure fans which usually have blades closer together and/or more blades. They are for forcing air through radiators and coolers, they usually flow less air for same rpm (maybe) but can make more pressure to push air through a restriction better. If your case is small or you are running faster fans a high pressure might work for a case fan as well. But remember speed makes noise, less/smaller fans will have to run harder to move the same air flow. In the end the temps in your case will tell you what flow you need.

I'd say an average system can run two front fans and a rear, plus the psu blowing out, and that works well for normal average things. And that is why many cases come with 3 fans.

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

At the end of the day, the related qualities most people tend to care about with their final system are performance, noise, stability, and longevity. "High airflow" itself is not one of these.

Essentially, you care that your components aren't reaching throttling temperatures, aren't triggering shutdowns, aren't causing significant damage, and that you don't have absurd levels of fan noise. If all you cared about is airflow, I have some industrial fan recommendations from Delta and the like that you could run at 100%.

Some people like to be particular about temperatures beyond the basics of how they affect the day-to-day capabilities of the system, though it's uncommon to work quantitatively with airflow directly. Most people cannot measure it accurately (manufacturer ratings are also not to be trusted), and comparisons are quite meaningless without understanding the full fan configuration. (Even if it were possible, merely knowing the magnitude, the volume of air moved by a fan in a given time, is not particularly meaningful.)

What rate is considered to be "high"...

Having said that, how many grains of sand can you remove from a heap of sand before it stops being a heap?

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