add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Do I need a hdd with an ssd?

DoNotStart

5 months ago

Like what the title says. Im just a beginner and planning my first build but do I need a hdd if i have a ssd?

Comments

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

but do I need a hdd if i have a ssd?

As in needing it so your pc works... no.

Getting the HDD will depend on your space requirements for all your data (videos, photos, movies, music, games, etc..). :)

If you have a large ssd which is sufficient for all your data then no... In my case, I have a small SSD, so I used to store all my data on a 2tb HDD which now is dead with all my information gone. So now I can only install a few games as my ssd is almost full.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 to the above, I have a 256GB kingston SSD which I loaded windows and most of my programs that interact with the windows registry.

I have a 2TB WD BLACK HDD that I put all of my games on. New AAA games are close to 50GB, so it wont take many games to fill up your SSD. Adding another drive is literally as easy as plugging in power and attaching a SATA cable.

I even salvaged an old 256GB HDD from my ancient laptop, plug and play no problems.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

If you can fit everything you need onto SSD's, that's preferable. With current SSD pricing, I'd say that if your games / photos / music / whatever adds up to much over 1 TB, you probably want to get a hard drive because of cost. 1 TB and under you are better off going all SSD for performance and reliability.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

You say "first build". Do you have a previous computer? How much room have you taken up. Do you follow the ancient dictum that the "steady state of a hard drive is full" (leave a bit of room for performance sake, but it doesn't have to be much more than 10%)?

The only thing HDDs are good for is holding data that would otherwise clog up a SSD. I'd go straight to the 4T drives for low capacity and others for higher - check Alan M. Systems long post in this thread for examples: https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/319006-what-do-you-guys-think-about-the-new-barracuda-pro-should-i-get-it-instead-of-the-wd-black

If 1TB isn't enough, the following should help. But expect a few headaches along the way, and just buying a 1TB drive is a lot easier.

If you are going with a new AMD system (or already have a B450/X470 motherboard) you can get one of those motherboards and try using StoreMI to include a 512G SSD (probably NVMe, like so: https://www.microcenter.com/product/600420/512gb-ssd-3d-nand-m2-2280-pcie-nvme-30-x4-internal-solid-state-drive and a 4T HDD. Partition the SSD into equal "boot" and "storage" partitions, and then set up the "storage" as a StoreMI drive (with the 4T [or more] drive). Then set up things so that the \user directory points to your "D:" StoreMI drive. CAUTION: StoreMI has issues, but I think avoiding using it as the boot drive should cover most of them. See this thread for details (especially the part I commented in): https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/318758-5400-rpm-hard-drive-2tb

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends what you save on your PC. You can get a 500gb or 1TB SSD for a good price today and that is often enough for most peoples windows+games. Don't need to worry about buying extra storage you won't be using anyways. For me however it is a must as I have several TB of videos saved and SSDs are very impractical for that.

Storage is also very upgradable later on too. Say you get that 1TB SSD now and in a couple years you run out of room, at that time buy another drive and install it in the system then. You can add a 2nd drive easily without having to remove the old drive.

Sad life can shorten if you use too much of thier capacity, they prefer to have free space. %50 if possible.

That is not what really shortens their life, it is if you write too much to it and with most users it will take 10+ years to hit that. The average HDD is not as likely to last as long as the average SSD in a home computer. I would recommend to keep at least 50gb of open space on the OS drive due to quirks of the OS (updates, temp files, etc)

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, if you already have sufficient SSD then I don't think you need an extra HDD. HDD’s are cheaper than SSD’s but at the same time, SSD's are far better than HDD's in many different ways. To know more about the differences between both the drives SSD & HDD, I suggest you to check out the below blog: https://www.stellarinfo.com/blog/ssd-or-hdd-choice-is-yours/

Hope it will help you clear your doubts.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Getting to the point, you can have any storage, just depends on speed or storage, personally you can have both but be looking to spend about $70-$150. Toshiba 5tb is about $140 but in an ssd for 5tb you're talking like $800? Do keep in mind ssds have a greater life span.

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually, with the prices going down they way they have, it's more like $475-$550 nowadays for 5TB of storage. (being done with 5 1TB devices)

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Wouldn't hurt to have that HDD in my opinion. I suppose many gamers do that anyway, keeping the SSD for games and then the HDD for the rest of their data especially since the former can be expensive. Cost-effective too as this suggests. Personally like to have extra room even if I don't end up consuming it all.

  • 5 months ago
  • -2 points

Sad life can shorten if you use too much of thier capacity, they prefer to have free space. %50 if possible.

So ideally you should only put things on the SSD that benefit from from the SSD speed. Such as Os and programs. Swap file ect. And then a cheaper HDD for storage that is not speed sensitive. Video files, pictures. Etc

But you don't have to, it's up to you the dual setup is just using each technology in a cost effective way

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Sad life can shorten if you use too much of thier capacity, they prefer to have free space. %50 if possible.

Not worth worrying about. Seriously, get a decent sized SSD. Any brand. Look at the TBW in the warranty, and do the math to figure out how long it would take to hit TBW under nearly any sort of normal use. Then consider the TBW value stated in the warranty is for the warranty, not the actual physical limit of the drive. Then, with a straight face, tell me users should be worrying about SSD lifespans. Barring some manufacturing defect that causes the memory controller to fail or something, it'll be decades before most current SSDs would be worn out through normal use.

And if you want to change arguments and quibble about optimum performance, that's fine. Even at 99% full a SSD will be faster than an HDD and for me that's kind of the point. SSDs are just storage, the sooner people treat them as such and not fragile devices that need extra special care and management, the better.

https://superuser.com/questions/1344650/how-much-slower-do-ssds-get-as-they-fill-up-or-age

There's just a lot of weird FUD and oversimplification and debatable advice repeated ad nauseam concerning SSDs that doesn't normally keep up with the state of the art. You can argue and cling to your current beliefs if you want. I'm just saying it's largely a waste of time and effort. And even with SSD prices being cheaper than ever, buying a drive twice the size you need to keep it under 50% utilization is still quite a premium to pay for dated nonsense.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

oversimplified, sure, its a forum post.

So I just opened Samsung magic on my HTCP, the 860 evo inside is 6 months old, a very mainstream basic consumer drive from a well respected manufacturer. and it has 8.7 terabytes written to date, if this were the 250 GB version it would have a TBW rating of 150, https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/product/consumer/860evo/ that breaks down to about 8 years at my current usage, that's probably enough but not necessarily ignorable. not all machines are the latest and greatest upgraded every 2 years, many are basic tools that run for a decade.

This is just an HTPC with only windows 10 and a few basic programs installed, a few browsers and adobe acrobat, no games, nothing strenuous, nothing creative, no user data, its being used as basically a living room tablet on a big screen.

the larger drives get progressively larger ratings, the 500GB 300, 1tb 600 and so on and so forth,

I have HDD from 15 years ago that still run, their capacity is tiny and the IDE interface is slow, they are play drives for side projects, and most of the drives I bought in that era have long ago died, but some still live on.

I agree to your point that SSD life should not be at the top of your concern, but I will not be ignoring it completely.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

8.7 TB in 6 months, that averages out to writing 47.8GB ever day for 182 days, I don't think that is anywhere close to normal usage for most users (I could be low-balling things though). The 3 year old evo 850 in my developer workstation is at 18.7TB and I probably would have guessed lower.

And as you mentioned large drives have higher TBW and even then at your usage rate you're looking at 16 and 32 years respectively for 500GB and 1TB, and that's pessimistic math. Not to mention SSDs are often capable of writing 1.5-3x what's stated for the warranty. https://techreport.com/discussion/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead a bit of a guestimation based on the results of multiple drives from multiple manufacturers, but even the drives that failed first went well beyond their warranty TBW limits and current drives are even more durable... so 12-24 years possibly, at the current rate of data usage for a 250GB 860 evo.

So I think my point remains, it's not worth worrying about. If for some reason you have to, that's fine. If your goal is still to be using the same 250GB SSD in 2027-2031 that's fine too. It's irresponsible to give users one size fits all advice based off edge case usage and not at least qualify it as such though. I think people have enough hardware things to worry about without manufacturing non-issues to worry about too.

oversimplified, sure, its a forum post.

Well, is that an excuse or a rationalization? OP isn't worthy of good information? Relevant information? Useful information? Forgive me, I disagree with the attitude that it's OK to phone it in because it's a forum.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I was surprised by the usage at first as well, especially when you break it down to the daily usage, but I dug a little deeper with the task manager, Netflix likes to use the disk, I assume its cashing ahead of playback., showing under the system process, % disk ranges from 0 to spikes into the 5mB/s range and just a rough guesstimate watching the noise averaging about 1mB/s,

Sounds like nothing but, 1,000,000 Bytes x 60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24 hours x 182 days = 15,724,800,000,000 Bytes or 16 tB just for Netflix in 6 months, this machine does not run netflix 24/7 but it does for a large portion of the day, in the morning my wife and toddler,, in the afternoon the big kids get home from school and watch something, in the evenings everybody but me will watch a family movie with popcorn, I get home from work at midnight and watch something into the wee hours.

plus windows updates, temporary internet files, downloads, page file when it runs out of memory, etc etc,, other than having 5 users throughout the day this is not a heavy or unusual load its just a 4k video streaming box.

Oversimplified: the OP says he/she is new, shall I reply to a single sentence question with 6 paragraphs on the finer points my of my probably overthought and out of date storage strategy? would that actually be helpful or just confusing and probably not apply to their use case?

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube