add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Realistic failure rates of SSD's/HDD's

WoodCutter3

58 months ago

Greetings all, I'm in the planning/parts buying phase of my first build. When it comes to the Storage decision I've been on the fence between getting a 128 GB SSD or a 500GB-1TB HDD for the system's one and only storage device. I had read something somewhere that solid state drives were rather sensitive to power surges and interuptions. The town I live in has the worst rate of power failures of anywhere I've ever lived. (I wake up to clocks blinking all over the house about once a month) In my simple web browsing/word processing machine that I'm planning, speed is secondary to reliability. So I've been leaning towards a WD Blue drive because of the flaky power in my location and concerns about SSD's with that. If one reads the reviews on NewEgg one would think that both HDD's and SSD's have almost an equal failure rate. Both types seem to have an unacceptably high number of DOA's and other weird failures. After reading hundreds of reviews I've concluded that the if its a crap shoot on the reliability anyway, I might as well save some money upfront and get the HDD.

Is my reasoning flawed? what do some of you think?

Thanks in advance for any replies...

Comments

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points
  • Avoid the issue altogether and purchase/use a decent UPS.
  • Some business SSD models of Samsung and Intel, have power protection designed into them but still not recommended to omit UPS use.
  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

AS Warlock said you should invest in a UPS if it's that much of an issue, although personally I'd recommend a HDD if you want decent storage and reliability, unless you're aiming for speed I don't feel SSD's are sufficiently cheap yet to benefit a general use pc.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

I would disagree with the MX100 hitting the affordability plateau. I would highly recommend a good UPS as well. I won't run a machine without one. You might look around your area and see if anyone is selling refurbs. That can be a good way to keep costs down and yet still get a good unit.

Brands to look at are APC and Tripplite. Stay away from the Chinese brands like Cyberpower. Attractive pricing but the batteries don't last. Be warned: any UPS will only last 5 years or so at best. Replacing the battery isn't hard but is a costly item.

BTW, these are not "surge protectors". All those are powerbars with a capacitor and diodes that try to smooth out the spikes in the powerline. Useful but fragile and will last about as long as a lit match in a thunderstorm.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Personally I'd say SSDs are worth the price, but only if you're looking for speed otherwise the price/storage ratio of SSD's I feel just isn't quite there yet.

But that's just my opinion they are a great storage option just not for all scenarios

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

If you pair them up with a hdd it's a great combo. For about $200* you can have loads of space and a very fast boot option/runtime option that should last you years.

*YMMV. This is N/A pricing. Still, you should be able to get something similar if you reduce the sizes from what I'd consider ideal, 256gb/2tb.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, for surge protection get a power strip with one built in.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you but at the risk of displaying my ignorance but....
What is a UPS? I'm assuming its some kind of battery pack kind of thing. I've never heard of/seen one. And more importantly are they expensive?

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Google it.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

What is a UPS?

You can click on the link (UPS) already provided in my first post. Definition, the types and selection in article.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

This. http://www.amazon.com/APC-BR1500G-BACK-UPS-10-Outlet-1500VA/dp/B003Y24DEU ... really any of the capacities there would probably work but I'd suggest to stay with the 1000 or higher just to make sure you have enough capacity. The key is to make sure you get one with AVR. I quote: "The Back-UPS Pro also features automatic voltage regulation (AVR), which instantly adjusts high and low voltages to safe levels, so you can work indefinitely during brownouts and overvoltages."

Don't just let Windoze install the drivers, install PowerChute Personal. Set to "sensitive" if you're really concerned even though the default setting is probably fine.

Then bask in your Captain America shield. Also protects from data loss during power outages!

SSD might be more sensitive, maybe, but think about this: all the stuff inside your computer is behind the power supply anyway. Therefore quit worrying about HDD vs. SSD and... (a) buy a good quality power supply with good protections and (b) read up and see if you can find the power supply with the best filtering and most capacity in its output smoothing capacitors.

I highly suggest SSD as long as it has sufficient capacity as your system drive if you're any kind of power user. It makes a HUGE difference in "feel" and usability of the PC.

If you need mass storage, put in an HDD separately.

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube