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Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming vs. Gigabyte GA Z170x Gaming 5"

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Good to hear that! I will probably build my new PC tomorrow :P That board sure looks pretty good with the matte black PCB and metal PCIe slots :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming vs. Gigabyte GA Z170x Gaming 5"

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm a little late but anyway.

According to the reviews Newegg, there seems to be a lot of problems with the Z170 Pro Gaming, and the Z170-A too. I always take negative user ratings with a grain of salt, but when you see the same issues being pointed out over and over again, to me there is definitely a problem. And the number of stability BIOS update there are on ASUS' website for these motherboard, for the short time they've been on the market, seems to confirm there are issues.

I bought the Z170X Gaming 5 myself, but I haven't used it yet (waiting for the CPU to arrive so I can build the PC). To me, if I compare with the ASUS offering in the same price range, in features alone, the Gaming 5 is a no-brainer.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Toms Hardware Forum"

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Totally agree, I found there are a lot of know-it-all people there who actually has no idea what they are talking about. And when someone ask for recommendation on hardware, there's always that guy who says "Get this", "Get that" based on his own needs and totally ignore the poster's needs.

Comment reply on Ahoexum's Completed Build: My Gaming PC

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I'm really wondering why they still released it under the TR2 branding... Why not TR3, so at least peoples would figure out they're not the same units

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I go with a sapphire 380x?"

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, considering the 380X is doesn't cost much more than the 380, I think I might as well spend the extra $20-30 or so and get a better card :P

Comment reply on Ahoexum's Completed Build: My Gaming PC

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

The 430W TR2 PSU is actually a decent budget PSU nowadays. People says it's crap based on a old Hardware Secrets review dating all the way back from... 2008. We are in 2015 now... At that time, it was made by HEC/Compucase and indeed used an old obsolete design. The newer one is completely different, it uses a totally different design and is manufactured by CWT. I mean, just look at it, it doesn't even look the same. I used this PSU in a lot of builds for my clients in the past 2 years, never ever received any support call regarding this PSU. It has been powering budget gaming PCs with GPUs ranging from the 750Ti to the R9 270, using the FX-6300 CPU for most of them. I'm just wondering why Themaltake kept the same SKU considering the old one had a very bad reputation.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I go with a sapphire 380x?"

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for sharing your experience!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I go with a sapphire 380x?"

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Unfortunately, since I plan on doing crossfire later and I already bought a 750W PSU (Which would be a bit on the low side for dual 390), I can't really go with power-hungry cards like the 390. I also live in Canada (as mentioned) so I can't get it for this price. But thanks anyway!

Comment reply on drgyji's Completed Build: First time building! :D

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

mATX motherbaords are usually cheaper, so if you don't need the extra expansion slots/features, there is no need to waste money on ATX size.

Comment reply on Riggings's Completed Build: When life gives you lemons, make Lemonade!

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

The Power supply is totally fine. The "TR2's aren't known for reliability" thing is based on old reviews dating from 2008... Except this unit has been redesigned at least 2 times since. It's now a completely different unit from what Hardware Secrets has reviewed 6 years ago, made by a different manufacturer (CWT) with different specs(420W on the 12V rails, which is excellent for a 430W PSU) and a different enclosure. It also has a good weight to it.

I've used the PSU in 4 builds without any problem, one of which is a OEM PC with poor airflow, where the PSU is the only exhaust for the GTX 750Ti (You can feel the very hot air coming from the PSU on the back) - No problem so far even when running at high temperatures.

Comment reply on Blog Post "PCPartPicker Mobile Site Now Available"

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

A very welcome improvement. I found the regular site was slow and painful to use on a phone, now it will be a much better experience!

Comment reply on fasterblue's Completed Build: Vida

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Replace the hard drive in her old computer. When it takes so long to boot or open a simple software, it's usually just the hard drive that has defective sectors(and will possibly die sometime soon). She will have 2 computers to work ;)

Comment reply on HCkev's Completed Build: (Client) Midrange gaming PC

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, although there is no official review yet, it seems to be a decent budget PSU, especially for less than $40, and definitely not as crap as the old model. Seems like Thermaltake is now taking PSUs seriously, even with the budget units. I wouldn't use it with a high graphic card though, but there is only one 6-pin PCIe connector anyway, which is fine for a 430W PSU.

Keep in mind also that there are 5 SATA connectors, and they are all on the same cable, so it might be tricky if you have an optical drive on top and some hard drives on the bottom, but the cable seemed to be long enough to easily reach even in a mid tower (although I haven't tried, as there are only a single hard drive in this build)

Comment reply on HCkev's Completed Build: (Client) Midrange gaming PC

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Most people where I live has OEM computers(as PC components are not much accessible, unless you order by the internet, which is what I do), and I want people to know how better a custom build is :)

The client had a good first impression when he saw the PC for the first time. He liked the case(definitely look higher quality than most OEM PC cases) and how the motherboard had a lot of USB ports.

Comment reply on HCkev's Completed Build: (Client) Midrange gaming PC

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for the comment. Cable management was rather easy, thanks to the case design and the fact that there was not too much cables coming from the PSU. The video card doesn't need a cable too, which helps keeping things nice and clean.

I could have done a slightly better job though - for instance, if it was my own build, I would better untangle the cables coming out of the PSU, but if I want the build to be profitable in time/money, I just can't spend an hour doing cable management. I still think I did a decent job and it's definitely a thousand time cleaner than the average PC. I still took the time to tie the PCIe 6-pin cable apart from the other cables for instance, so it's easily accessible if the client ever want to change the video card later and need the 6-pin conenctor.

Good to hear the PSU has been running strong for 2 years of heavy use. And I even think the model I have is a more recent and better revision than yours, I know it has been updated in the last few years but I don't know exactly when(very little information. What is the UL number on yours? (it's written on the PSU under a big "RJ" or something that looks like that) Is it E161451 or E303666? (the later is the newer version)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget AMD FX-4300 Build, Light gaming and AutoCAD(Comment and opinions please :D)"

  • 76 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm not sure if it's too late, but I was planning a build for someone using AutoCAD, and from what I've seen here (http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/AutoDesk-AutoCAD-2013-GPU-Acceleration-164/), Nvidia cards does perform much better than AMD cards with AutoCAD. Not sure why, but apparently, even a low-end GTX 650 performs better than a Radeon 7970...

So it might be worth considering. The best bang for the buck for AutoCAD, according to the same benchmarks, is a GTX 660, which performs just slightly less than a GTX 680.

Comment reply on Trinergy's Completed Build: Nephew's PC

  • 77 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't see any problem with the PSU, according to TechPowerUp's review, it's the same PSU inside as the Corsair TX750, but with much more useful modular cable setup.

Comment reply on aludka's Completed Build: Rebuild

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Ahah, I like how you removed the ugly Cooler Master logo to put the MSI badge :D

Comment reply on theshocka's Completed Build: Mk.2

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, for $300(and less) it's a beast that will max out pretty much any games at 60FPS. Incredible price/performance ratio. The good thing is that apparently you can crossfire the 280X with the 7970, so you can buy a 7970 now for cheaper and then, in 2-3 years, crossfire it with a 280X ;) I'm planning a build for a friend and realized that I could now get a 7970 for the same price of the GTX 760 I was planning to use ($269.99 in Canada). The 7970 is a no-brainer here XD

Comment reply on theshocka's Completed Build: Mk.2

  • 78 months ago
  • 1 point

The 280X is basically just a rebranded 7970, so just look at the 7970 benchmarks ;)

Comment reply on theshocka's Completed Build: Mk.2

  • 78 months ago
  • 2 points

You really didn't need a 750W power supply for this build. You're not going to be able to do crossfire due the the Mini ITX board, so something like a 550W would have been more than enough and would probably be physically smaller and fit perfectly.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PCIE 2.0 @ 8x for SLI GTX 760 - Any bottleneck?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard is ASUS M5A99X EVO R2.0. Only the first slot is 16x, so both card would run at 8x in SLI...

Well, PCI-express 2.0 16x barely bottleneck a Titan, so it shouldn't bottleneck a 760. However, I'm wondering if it bottlenecks at 8x, and if it does, how much. Sometimes the bottleneck is so negligible that it's not worth talking about. :/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PCIE 2.0 @ 8x for SLI GTX 760 - Any bottleneck?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm starting to believe there might be some bottleneck. But of course, they are comparing with a Titan, which is much more powerful than the 760... It's hard to tell :/

The motherboard is an Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0 with FX-8350 CPU. As you can see from the picture of the back of the board on Newegg, the second PCI-express slot, despite being full-length, is actually wired for 8x. This is not the case with the PRO version of the motherboard though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PCIE 2.0 @ 8x for SLI GTX 760 - Any bottleneck?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

From what I understand from the article, the motherboard they are using has PCIE 3.0 but runs the 3 cards at 8x, making it match the speed of PCIE 2.0 16x. But no mention of PCIE 2.0 @ 8x anywhere :(

Comment reply on Forum Topic "4770k vs 4670k?!"

  • 80 months ago
  • 2 points

You will preferably need both a good CPU and GPU. Not everything is GPU accelerated. I do 3D modeling myself, and for instance, when you're rendering maps (baking normal map or Occlusion map from a Hi-res model, for example), or rendering a scene through a renderer(not real-time 3D), renderers such as V-ray and mental Ray uses mostly the CPU as far as I know. I'm pretty sure it's the same for Blender. The GPU is more used for the real-time preview in the software, and to play the game you're making in Unity.

And if you do digital sculpting, I believe ZBrush is more heavy on the CPU than the GPU.

Also, the GPU acceleration in video editing softwares like Adobe Premiere is more for the quick rendering of the effects in the preview, so you can see how your video looks like almost instantly. When you actually encode the video once you're done editing, I'm pretty sure it still rely solely on the CPU.

If it was mainly a gaming build, the i5 would be perfectly fine, but for your use, the i7 perfectly makes sense.

Also, if you don't plan on upgrading the CPU later, I think the Ivy-Bridge i7 3770k is still a great choice. The performance difference between the 3770k and 4770k is quite marginal, yet Haswell CPUs and motherboards does cost a fair bit more money. I personally think Haswell is not worth it for now, they're too expensive for no real benefit, except for laptops(due to the better idle power consumption and better integrated graphics - Which doesn't matters in your case).

And if you're short on budget or otherwise want to save some money, don't forget the red team, the FX-8350 is an excellent CPU for multi-threaded tasks like what you'll be doing with the PC. It will perform better than the i5 for video editing and rendering while costing less. The weakness of this CPU tough, is the single-threaded performance - So in a number of games, it will perform slightly less than the i5, although nothing major (maybe 3-4 FPS - The GPU will make a much bigger difference). If video editing and 3D rendering is a higher priority over gaming, I would personally choose the 8350 over the i5, but if you can spend the extra money on the i7, it's going to be worth it.

Hope this helps :)

By curiosity, which video card do you plan using?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best LGA1150 motherboard under $120?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Why no Gigabyte?..

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AMD FX 8350 vs I5 3570K"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I wouldn't trust CPUBoss, their conclusion is pathetic, they seems to be highly biased toward Intel. They show 4 scores, and the FX-8350 beats the i5-3570k in 3 of 4 scores, the i5-3570k beating the 8350 only in single core performance, and the i5 is still the winner? This doesn't make any sense. Especially if add up the 4 scores, it ends up at 33.2/40 for the i5-3570k and 34.3/40 for the FX-8350. How is the i5 the winner if their own scores favor the 8350?...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Great PSU sale, dont know which one to pick"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

I wouldn't recommend any of those two PSUs. The Cooler Master has too much electrical noise starting at 400W, which isn't good for your components. And the Ultra LS provide 400W at best and I wouldn't trust it past 300W. Don't skimp on the power supply.

If you're on budget, get maybe an Antec VP-450 or a Corsair CX500. At least, theses are good units that will provide enough power and won't risk damaging your components, and won't make fireworks after a few years(or months).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "750W for SLI GTX 770 and FX-8350?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, obviously I don't want the PSU to run at its rated power all the time, but how many time the CPU and GPU will be both running at 100%? Very rarely, it might be pushing the PSU a bit when stress-testing the CPU and GPUs altogether, but it will otherwise probably be totally fine under real-world usage, I think.

Just like overclocking, many people keep the CPU at 80°C when running Prime95; Obviously, you don't want your CPU to run that hot all the time, but it only get so hot when stress-testing for several hours; It usually runs a fair bit cooler under real world usage.

I feel that 750W will be "just okay" - It will work without problem, but simply not the "best case scenario". It probably won't be safe to do much more upgrades than adding another 770 - But I highly doubt he will do more upgrade than that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "750W for SLI GTX 770 and FX-8350?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep, the PSU is rated for 62A, which meets Nvidia's recommendations. But of course, it's a good habit to take something slightly better than what's recommended.

But I feel that PSU requirements are often over-estimated. With my current PC, which I built 4.5 years go, I made the mistake of choosing a Cooler Master eXtreme Power Plus 600 PSU, which I later figured out it was a crappy PSU and that it isn't safe to pull more than 450W from it(according to Hardware Secrets). I'm probably pulling around 500W from it with my current specs and it still works fine... Might be luck. But this time, the Thermaltake Smart 750W I plan using actually received good ratings, so there should be no risks. Harware Secrets were able to safely pull 900W from the Corsair TX750 v2, which is the same as the Thermaltake internally. Should be fine I guess...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "750W for SLI GTX 770 and FX-8350?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your input. He is not really an enthusiast (he never build a PC, so i will build it for him and overclock it too), and I don't plan on making extreme overclocking (It would need a better CPU cooler to do so). Probably no more than 4.5GHz(500MHz increase), although I have no experience with the 8350 yet, so it's hard to guess how much OC I will be able to pull off with a Corsair H60 - But I don't expect too much.

Yeah, 850W would be the safe bet... But I feel like the 750W might be fine under real-world usage. The only upgrade he plan on doing is adding a video card, and maybe adding more RAM(which shouldn't add that much more wattage), but 8GB should be plenty for the next years, unless games suddenly start using more RAM.

Still a hard decision :P

Comment reply on Forum Topic "750W for SLI GTX 770 and FX-8350?"

  • 80 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, that's encouraging. I don't think a 750W would blow up because it has 10W less, ahah! :P

Comment reply on NewUsr's Completed Build: Chiefs - 1k Budget build

  • 81 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow, you really got amazingly low prices on these components :O

Comment reply on Khaem's Completed Build: 1000$ Extreme settings capability

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

What about the motherboard? I heard this mobo throttles down the FX-8350 CPU when on load. Does it happen to you?

Comment reply on jdowdy10's Completed Build: 2nd Upgradeable/Gaming PC

  • 82 months ago
  • 1 point

So basically, you would recommend a Kuhler 620 over this? Is it the pump that is noisy or it is the included fan?

Comment reply on jdowdy10's Completed Build: 2nd Upgradeable/Gaming PC

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

Just for curiosity, why do you give the Zalman watercooler two stars? Any issues with it?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "To overclock or not to overclock?, that is the question"

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

A CPU typically last over 10 years, so even with extreme overclocking, you'll probably upgrade your PC long before it dies. What can kill a CPU is mainly too much voltage and heat, so as long as you keep the temps and voltage at a safe level, it shouldn't reduce the lifespan much.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "To overclock or not to overclock?, that is the question"

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

As for the fact that overclocking voids the warranty, technically it's true, but in reality, unless you did overclock so badly that it made visible physical damage, which is nearly impossible (the CPU would throttle and shut the computer down long before overheating), AMD and Intel really has no way of telling a CPU has been overclocked, as the multiplier and voltage are saved to the motherboard.

If you need to return it, just don't tell them it has been overclocked, they wouldn't know. But it's very unlikely to have a CPU going bad, unless you've done something really wrong with it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8-port router, or ethernet switch? For using with a NAS server."

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the answer! So the switch I mentioned(Trendnet TEG-S80G) should handle the NAS without problem? (The reviews are quite positive, so I guess it's fine)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "SH-224BB/BEBE vs. SH-224BB/RSBS ???"

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

From what I see, the RSBS seems to be a retail version (with box, probably some trial burning software included, a useless manual and things like that), while the BEBE is OEM, i.e. DVD drive only. I think they are otherwise pretty much the same(On Samsung's website it's listed as SH-224BB, without the letters at the end).

If you can get both a the same price, you might get a few benefits getting the retail one, there might be some useful things included(maybe a SATA cable) but otherwise, I wouldn't care too much. Most people don't need that stuff anyway and if you don't want a useless box and manual, then just get the OEM. But really, get whichever is cheaper or sold on the site you like the most or the one that ship it for cheaper.

I wouldn't be worried about a DVD drive, I usually just take the cheapest I can find and it does the job(though on some builds I might spend a little extra for the look of the drive).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "will i need a sound card or will on board audio be good enough?"

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

I wouldn't spend on a sound card unless you have some expensive audiophile equipment (Remember, the sound is as good as the weakest link!). Onboard audio is pretty decent nowadays and more than enough for most people for gaming and general use. I don't think you'll notice a difference with your 5.1 system and headphones. Spend the money on the GPU instead (if it's gaming PC, of course)

Comment reply on wrivera's Completed Build: First build after 10 years

  • 83 months ago
  • 1 point

They usually comes with the case, not the motherboard. Sometimes they are pre-installed, otherwise there is a small box or bag in the case that contains various screws and spare pieces when you first open the case.

Comment reply on wrivera's Completed Build: First build after 10 years

  • 83 months ago
  • 2 points

It's hard to see in the pictures, but it seems you forgot to use the motherboard standoffs, which is why the motherboard was shorting itself on the case. With the standoffs in place, there will be a gap behind the motherboard so the solder points won't touch the case.

Comment reply on wrivera's Completed Build: First build after 10 years

  • 83 months ago
  • 4 points

It's hard to see in the pictures, but it seems you forgot to use the motherboard standoffs, which is why the motherboard was shorting itself on the case. With the standoffs in place, there will be a gap behind the motherboard so the solder points won't touch the case.

Comment reply on HCkev's Completed Build: Editing Rig / Workstation

  • 84 months ago
  • 1 point

(Sorry for the delayed reply - Didn't see your comment at first)

We're mainly a photography studio, but we also do video editing in Premiere and Aftereffect, which makes good uses of CUDA (you need to edit the CUDA support list and add the GTX 670 as it's not "officially" supported, but many people use it and it works fine).

We also do high-resolution panoramas, which can sometimes be made from thousands RAW pictures(we have a robot that automatically move the camera and take the pictures) to create a huge, several Gigapixel-big image. Stitching everything together and the automatic fixing of things such as mismatching stuff between pictures, perspective and moving people/cars/etc is very resources consuming, and the software does support GPU acceleration, which allows to get previews much faster.

Photoshop also benefit from GPU acceleration, though it's as much of a "must have" if you're not using a lot of filters - Still a great bonus we can't complaint on.

So basically, the GPU is mainly used for computing rather than real-time graphics like what we see in games.

Comment reply on New Part Categories: Case Fans, Thermal Paste, Speakers, And Wired/Wireless Network Interfaces

  • 85 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice new features, definitely useful.

Would be nice to add support RAID cards in expansion cards, as they are quite expensive, so anyone would like to see the best price easily :)

Also, is there any reason for Best Direct to not be in the retailers list(on the Canadian website)? I bought several components from this website and it's a great one, lots of great deals and free shipping with orders over $80.

Comment reply on thereddog's Completed Build: Cassini HTPC v3

  • 86 months ago
  • 1 point

This would also be a very nice small form factor gaming PC :)

Comment reply on infidusandrew's Completed Build: Brandon's (My Brother) Gaming Rig

  • 86 months ago
  • 1 point

1000W PSU? Knowing that the motherboard doesn't support 3-way SLI, I don't see how this build would need that much power.

Comment reply on CCASystems's Completed Build: Bread and Butter

  • 86 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a micro ATX board with only 2 RAM slots. This allow to upgrade to 8GB in the future. My guess.

Comment reply on customxyz's Completed Build: Recently built gaming rig over the Newegg Holiday Sales

  • 86 months ago
  • 1 point

18°C Idle? unless you room temperature is like 15°C, that's seems unrealistically low.

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add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube