add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Case made of wood"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

This has been done many times by many different craftspeople. Some are commercially available. A quick google for "wood computer case" should turn up hundreds of examples.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bootable USB"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What exactly do I need to do with the clonezilla program? [ ... ] (I want a clean install as I have a lot of bloatware)

Cloning software is only needed if you want to copy your existing Windows installation to a new drive. But you're going to do a fresh install on the new drive, then you don't need it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bootable USB"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point
  1. If you're planning on replacing the HDD with the SSD, you will need special software to "clone" the Windows installation and all files. There are many vendors that provide such software. (I've personally used Clonezilla, and it works fine, but I wouldn't describe its user interface as friendly.)
  2. No special drivers are needed to use the SSD.
  3. This is actually complicated, depending on your laptop and the kind of enclosure you put the HDD in:
    • If your laptop supports USB 3, and you put the HDD in a USB 3 enclosure, then in terms of raw performance, your HDD will be a hair slower in an external enclosure than it was when it was internal (due to USB-SATA translation). However, because Windows won't be constantly accessing it for swap and system files, it may seem a bit faster.
    • If your laptop only supports USB 2, or you put the HDD in a USB 2 enclosure, then your HDD will be capped at USB 2's maximum speed, which is about 48 MB/sec. Since most modern HDDs can easily do 100MB/sec over native SATA, this will be a huge slowdown.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What editing software do you recommend?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

There's a free version of Lightworks available for Windows. It's feature-crippled in some ways, but there's enough there to give you a good idea if it'll meet your needs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Acer XR342CK Pbmiiqphuzx"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Here's the flavors I could find:

The UM.CX2AA.001 appears to be an earlier version with some differences in specs, and the one that appears here on PCPP. While Acer seems to have disappeared it from their Web site, it still shows up in online stores everywhere, and references to it can still be found on Acer's online forum:

https://community.acer.com/en/discussion/537676/xr342ck-difference-between-sub-models-bmijpphz-bmijqphuzx-bmijqphuzx#_ga=2.154199984.942618183.1557441441-1338977214.1557441441

Comment reply on Forum Topic "question.. what to do with recorded gameplay videos..."

  • 3 months ago
  • -1 points

Get an enormous external drive or NAS to use as your archival/backup drive. Copy all your original footage to it, as well as all your other media assets and editing project files so that, if desired, you can re-construct old videos from original materials.

Depending on the imagery, 1080p looks pretty good in H.264 at 3-4Mbits/sec, but YooToob/Vimeo/Twitch is going to re-encode it, anyway, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. (Do your own experiments at various bitrates and see when you start noticing degraded imagery.)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What do you think of this of a cheap linux computer to mess around on, never done a linux computer before"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, that's perfectly adequate for just messing around. (That InWin case comes with its own PSU, so you don't need the Rosewill.)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The correct way to update your hardware?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

There is no order, but I personally find it best to update motherboard drivers first -- fixes applied there may help further installations go more smoothly.

Consider downloading all the drivers/updates beforehand on to a USB drive. That way you won't have to expose your machine to the network before you've applied all the updates/patches.

To update something, you have to download all the patches/drivers available or just the last one

The release notes will tell you for sure, but most commonly all you need is the latest file.

Where do you download these updates? Do i have to go to each manufacter of each of my hardware and search for the drivers of that specific piece of hardware?

Yes, that is the best way to do it. Installing device drivers via Windows Update never works.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Preview the upcoming responsive layout at Cycling Builder"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, this totally caught me by surprise...

Might want to document somewhere that the domain cdn.cyclingbuilder.com needs to be whitelisted before posting comments will work.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Good Linux Distros?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Linux Mint is well-regarded. You could also try bare Debian, which offers a choice of UI frameworks at installation (Xcfe4 isn't too bad).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2019.02.22 Only @ Newegg: LG 24UD58-B Monitor 24" 4K IPS 10-bit FreeSync: $230.00 w/code"

  • 6 months ago
  • 0 points

Which, for some of us, is good enough.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which is better: "3000@16-16-16-36" or "3600@19-20-20-40""

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Someone else please correct me if I'm wrong, but:

What you're trying to measure is actual elapsed time between accesses, which means you have to do some arithmetic.

First number, CAS Latency:

  • 3000@16 == 16 * (1 / (3.0 * 109 )) == 5.333nS
  • 3600@19 == 19 * (1 / (3.6 * 109 )) == 5.278nS

So the 3600 part is barely one percent faster during sequential access.

Second Number, Row-Column Delay:

  • 3000@16 == 5.333nS (as above)
  • 3600@20 == 20 * (1 / (3.6 * 109 )) == 5.556nS

This makes the 3600 part about 4% slower on random access.

So we're talking about a best case improvement of a lousy one percent. For myself, I'd say this was firmly in the "Not Worth It" category.

Comment reply on Jasonlandastan's Completed Build: Winter 2019 9900K / 2080 Ti RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Ultrawides are so underrated in my opinion.

Gratuitous self-promotion: Chime in here with your thoughts, please... :-)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ultra-Wide or 4K?"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Let's arbitrarily call it USD$625.00.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question on NAS drives"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

You need a special program that interacts with the drive's SMART system. Apparently smartmontools is one tool that can do this. (CAUTION: This is a command line program written by geeks for geeks, and even they find it confusing and frequently have to refer to the documentation. If you choose to use this tool, be careful and go slow.)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question on NAS drives"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

how many times does a nas vs a non-nas retry?

On a NAS drive, TLER is often configurable, from a few seconds to several minutes. On a non-NAS drive, the retries can last theoretically forever. (There are sectors that are definitely good (return data immediately), sectors that are definitely bad (return error immediately), and sectors that are in between. It's this latter set that gets retried.)

If your needing to retry a **** load of times then you got problems with the drive itself going bad, right?

Correct. The drive's SMART report will often tell you how bad off your drive is.

If I bought the seagate ironwolf (the cheapest large cap. drive atm) is it possible to turn off the TLER (or whatever it uses) feature?

Yes, TLER can be turned off. Indeed, NAS drives frequently ship with it turned off, as only the customer can know what the appropriate setting is.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question on NAS drives"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

A so-called "NAS" drive is the product of artificial market segmentation. The feature that primarily distinguishes "NAS" drives from other drives is how it handles errors (variously called ERC, TLER, CCTL, etc.) -- basically, what the drive should do when it encounters an error reading data from the platters.

"Normal" desktop drives will retry over and over again until they get a sufficiently error-free read of the sector. Depending on how badly corrupted the sector is, this can take a very long time.

In NAS systems, however, if a drive takes an unusually long time to process a command, the system will assume the drive has gone walkabout, and mark it offline, degrading your storage pool or effectively rendering it inaccessible. "NAS" drives, therefore, allow you to control the drive's behavior, limiting the amount of time the drive will retry the sector before giving up and returning an error. The NAS system then takes appropriate action.

Here's the Dirty Little Secret: Once upon a time, nearly all hard drives supported some variation of TLER. Then the manufacturers got the Bright IdeaTM of disabling the feature in "consumer" drives, and charging a premium for "NAS" drives even though, in all other respects, the drives are identical.

As for louder, that's down almost entirely to spindle speed. As a rule, the higher the RPMs, the louder the drive, whether they're "NAS" or not.

"NAS" drives are entirely appropriate in a desktop machine, whether you enable the TLER feature or not.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bridge vs Switch"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

It DependsTM . You haven't shared any hints about your setup or needs.

Without knowing more, you're probably okay using unmanaged Ethernet switches. If you use quality Cat.6 cable, each individual Ethernet cable can be up to 100m (328 ft.) in length. Any longer than that, and you need a switch/repeater or some other signal booster.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need UPS? PC new ."

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Again, the Wirecutter article will answer most of your questions, but briefly:

  • A surge protector will prevent power surges from reaching and damaging your computer.
  • A UPS will supply power to your PC for $(TIME_INTERVAL) when the power dies.

Most (all?) UPSs include surge protection. The best ones include automatic voltage regulation -- adjusting for tiny under- and over-voltage irregularities in power, to a much finer degree than surge protectors offer.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need UPS? PC new ."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

It DependsTM .

This Wirecutter article does a pretty good job outlining all the reasons you might/might not want a UPS and, if so, how large a UPS to get.

To properly size a UPS, you'll need to know how much power your PC and peripherals will consume when on battery. Don't just guess; measure it using one of these.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Yeti Microphone"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

It's all a trade-off, depending on what you want.

Skype/Twitch/gaming chat typically implies a tiny boom microphone on a headset. Such setups are preferred in that context because the mic moves with your head. They also (usually) feature noise cancellation. However, those same features mean the mic almost always sounds like thin rubbish.

By contrast, mics like the Blue Yeti sound much better, but they sit on your desk, and they also pick up room echo and ambient noise. As long as you have the mic properly oriented toward you and keep your mouth inside the mic's pickup envelope, you'll sound mostly okay. Move outside that area, and you'll sound bad and/or fade out.

Compared to gaming headsets, the Blue Yeti sounds great when used properly. Compared to other side-address condenser mics in the same price range (such as the AudioTechnica AT2035), it's barely entry-level.

All that being said, the Blue Yeti is one of the most popular podcasting microphones out there with lots of happy users. If you're looking for something cheaper, the Blue Snowball is also very popular.

Comment reply on cheeseandcereal's Completed Build: 126TB NAS + Proxmox Virtualization Server

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

BTW, where are you keeping this thing? That many spinning disks and fans can't possibly be at all quiet.

Blatant Self-Aggrandizement: I built a new FreeNAS box for myself earlier this year. Just one RAID-Z2 vdev, but 16TB should keep me happy for a while.

Comment reply on cheeseandcereal's Completed Build: 126TB NAS + Proxmox Virtualization Server

  • 8 months ago
  • 4 points

Not seeing a 10Gb Ethernet interface; getting data in/out of that thing will take days over a gigabit link.

I hope your decision to forego ECC RAM doesn't bite you.

If data integrity was important enough to set up ZFS with RAID-Z2, and you're prepared to spend north of six grand putting it together, then you might also want to think about adding an LTO-6 or better tape drive for backups.

Otherwise, it's a very impressive build.

Comment reply on ewhac's Completed Build: Alexandria Mk. II

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry, but I don't have any detailed benchmarks on the system. However, it has absolutely no trouble keeping a 1Gb/sec Ethernet link saturated for both reads and writes over a CIFS share (unless it's a Windows client, where it tops out at 500Mb/sec, because Windows is garbage).

The SSD is basically hosting the OS. I haven't done anything special with the SLOG, so it's whatever the default setup is.

The only major customization I've done is set up three jails -- one running an SMTP server, one running minidlna for media serving, and one running a Bacula controller and storage daemon (which I may end up changing to Bareos or UrBackup or BURP or something else, because Bacula is a configuration nightmare).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Port Forwarding for video games"

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

Port forwarding can only be done through the router/gateway.

Be aware of the system and network security implications when doing so; you are essentially opening up the machine to direct access from everywhere on the Internet. In an ideal universe, the system you're opening up for access would be:

  • Locked down, running only essential services,
  • On a subnet isolated from all your other machines,
  • Fully backed up,
  • Have all latest security patches installed.

You can mitigate some of this via router/gateway rules that restrict access to a whitelist of IP addresses, but these can sometimes be tricky to get right, depending on the make/model of your router and how terrible their UI is.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Make a full body exercise regime for me"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I suggest avoiding the Insanoflex :-) .

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Most comfortable, bass heavy headphones under 250?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Sony MDR-V6 lover for 25+ years here, and I would dispute that assertion. MDR-V6s are not bass-heavy; they have the right amount of bass.

If you want bass-heavy, Beats is the big name there, and they come in a zillion different -- albeit overpriced -- styles.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Good 3tb HDD for FreeNAS"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing wrong with a $400 build, provided you're aware of the limitations of such an inexpensive build. For example, such a system is not likely to be reliable over the long term, and therefore would not be appropriate for data archival and storage. OTOH, it would be fine for a small, light-duty home media server for which you have backups.

In my case, I wanted a system for data archival and storage (and media serving). Hence, my box is much more expensive but, as a consequence, is much more resilient in the face of hardware failures -- ECC RAM to protect against bit-flips, and two parity drives to defend against drive failure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Good 3tb HDD for FreeNAS"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

ECC RAM is very strongly encouraged to ensure data integrity:

https://doc.freenas.org/11/intro.html#ram

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Good 3tb HDD for FreeNAS"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

You don't want "archival" drives, as those are either "shingled" drives (monstrous performance hit when writing data), and/or have cost-reduced innards based on the assumption that you will write data to the drive once and then only ever look at it again perhaps a handful a times (y'know, like tax returns -- things you have to keep, but don't ever really look at again).

Likewise, you don't necessarily need a "NAS" drive. But you do want a drive where you can change the TLER (Time-Limited Error Recovery) setting. "NAS" drives let you change this, but not all desktop drives will (because artificial market segmentation).

My FreeNAS box has six 5400RPM HGST Deskstar drives in it. I chose the 5400RPM "Coolspin" drives because they consume less power, make less heat and noise, and don't need to be performance monsters for my use case.

(Hope your FreeNAS build includes ECC RAM; far too many people skimp on that...)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will a drive make noise if it's not being used?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends on how you have power management configured.

If a drive is not accessed after a certain time, you can configure the drive to spin down to conserve power. The down-side of that is, when you access the drive, you have to wait for it to spin up. Most applications will tolerate the wait, but a few might complain.

7200 RPM drives are louder than 5400 RPM drives. I have a NAS on my desk with six 5400 RPM drives in it, all of which are spinning all the time, and I barely notice it. Fans will typically make more noise than your drives.

DO NOT get the cheapest 2TB drive you can find. It may be a "refurbished" drive that actually came out of an old PC or server and may have thousands of hours of usage on it. Make sure the drive you get is new or "factory refurbished" and comes with a full warranty.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3.5" HDD Thicknesses"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

The "thickness" of a 3.5" HDD is in fact very well standardized, in EIA-740:

https://doc.xdevs.com/doc/Seagate/SFF-8301.PDF

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_disk_drive_form_factors

While the standard allows for a height of up to 42mm, drives of that size haven't been made in decades. You can basically treat all 3.5" HDDs as being 26.10mm high or less.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU Overheating at idle?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Things to Check:

  • Protective plastic cover (if present) removed from heat sink.
  • Thermal paste spread evenly across the entire surface of the CPU.
  • Heat sink mounted flat on CPU with even spring pressure (i.e. not tilted, or with one side under more tension than another).
  • Fan for heat sink plugged in to fan header on motherboard (consult your motherboard manual for where these are).

Other things to check:

  • Reboot system to desktop. Before launching anything else, monitor CPU temperature for about ten minutes. Is it reasonable, or does it shoot up to 75C straightaway?
  • If the latter, reboot in safe mode, and check temps again. Same problem? (If so, then it's probably not software-related.)
  • When the CPU is running hot, what does the system monitor say about CPU activity? Is the system really idle, or are one or more CPU cores pegged at 100%?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Lopking for a Switch"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I am having difficulty selecting a switch that is affordable ~ $60 or less preferable, not too many ports than I need, and reliable.

You're kidding, right? Gigabit switches are plentiful and dirt cheap these days:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&N=100158106%20600052097%20601295938%20600015695%20600015742&cm_sp=Cat_Wired-Networking_1-_-VisNav-_-Unmanged_3

The cost difference between 5-port and 8-port switches is effectively epsilon, especially compared to the cost of not having an open port when you need to plug in One More Thing.

NetGear, D-Link, and LinkSys are usually good. I personally have had uneven experience with TrendNet, but to be fair that was over ten years ago.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Slowest mousepad?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

The KeSPA mouse pad is refered to as the "Blue jean pad" and one person refered to them as the "denim" pad. Of course I instantly tested some jeans. No success.

Denim comes in many weights. Also consider cotton duck and/or canvas.

Cooking pads are mostly wood, and wood surfaces have smooth glide. [ ... ]

Cutting boards come in several materials. In particular, I'm thinking of a rubberized textured plastic board I think we picked up at Target...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I connect two different branded light strips together?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

As of this writing, the general answer is, "No, it won't work." There is no standard interconnect for decorative lighting strips.

Now, it's possible that Brand X and Brand Z both use the same underlying components ("American components, Russian components... all made in Taiwan!"), but you won't know that without some understanding of electronics, and read the specs and schematics very closely. So, in general, the answer is, sadly, No.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Slowest mousepad?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Another alternative would be to just buy a length of neoprene -- the material used to make diving suits and inexpensive mousepads. Neoprene comes in a nearly infinite variety of colors and laminated fabrics, and can be bought by the foot.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Slowest mousepad?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Never before heard of someone requesting this. As a consequence, you may end up having to make one yourself.

Grab your mouse and existing mousepad (or a flat slab of wood) and visit a fabric store. Drape fabrics over the mousepad/wood, run the mouse over them, and see how they feel. I suspect you'll have better luck among the upholstery fabrics (as opposed to garnment fabrics). In particular, check out what's available in "cotton velveteen." Be aware that velveteen will wear down over time.

(views YooToob video on the KeSPA mouse pad) Hmm, I see. I still think there's a good chance you'll find something among the upholstery fabrics.

Alternatively, visit the kitchen/cooking section of Target or Bed Bath & Beyond and check out the cutting boards (i.e. boards on which you cut things with a knife). Some of them may have the texture you're looking for. (Also: Dishwasher safe!)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question about Windows Download Keys"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Microsoft holds the copyright on Windows. Copyright law grants you a monopoly on copying and distributing things for which you hold the copyright.

Therefore, the only sanctioned source for Windows is Microsoft itself (and its authorized resellers), and Microsoft charges around US$100.00 per copy.

Comment reply on Logarythym's Completed Build: HP Pavilion is Getting Loopy

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 just for the KryoFlux. (Good luck making sense of their docs.)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My opinion on Nvidia Graphics Cards- June 2018"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

You're forgetting that NVIDIA manage their supply chain very closely. By the time the new generation of cards comes out, supplies of the previous generation will have almost completely drained from the market. This is so that sales of NVIDIA's newest chips aren't cannibalized by the previous gen. (Go ahead and try to find a new GTX-980.) So if you're thinking about scoring a discount on previous gen GPUs when the new gen shows up, you may find yourself disappointed.

Comment reply on ewhac's Completed Build: Alexandria Mk. II

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Couple of updates:

After seeing a number of worrying messages in the system logs, I've replaced all the unfamiliar SATA cables that came with the chassis with commonly available red flat cables. I also disconnected the Loud Fan on the left, and now the system is much quieter at the cost of slightly higher CPU temps (now idling at around 40C). I may experiment with replacing the fan with hopefully quieter ones (assuming such things can be found).

I haven't truly loaded up the system with data yet, but so far the machine is working well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Linux Compatability Questions"

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

These days, Linux pretty much runs on every desktop machine out of the box. Laptops are a little dodgier because laptop manufacturers are still doing Weird ThingsTM to try and differentiate themselves. For example, fingerprint readers aren't supported well.

On desktops, if you have any headaches at all, it's usually around sound/audio. Simple stereo sound almost always works straight away, but if you want to do anything more complicated (e.g. 5.1 surround), be prepared to do some reading. You will have to jump through an extra hoop to enable NVIDIA's proprietary graphics driver, but it's worth the trouble. Ubuntu makes this relatively easy to do.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is it dangerous to use an old HD?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

The absolute worst that's happened is that the read/write heads inside the drive got knocked around and damaged. In practice, this would manifest as a drive that either makes a horrible screeching noise, or won't spin up at all. It will present no hazard to the rest of the machine.

If you want to be especially certain, get an inexpensive external USB housing, put the drive inside, and test it that way.

Since the drive has taken a tumble, test it thoroughly before putting it back into regular service.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ensuring You Guys Get The Commission"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for your candor on the topic.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I am starting to lose my sh*t"

  • 17 months ago
  • 3 points

Do you have any alternative suggestions to Acronis True Image?

You may care to investigate this: http://www.clonezilla.org/

Definitely for gear-heads. Not as shiny as Acronis, but Free Software and not crippled.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1800 for Failed Read/Write Heads Repair?!"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup. Sorry. This is the current and common state of hard drive recovery. It is a capital- and labor-intensive process -- skilled (read: expensive) people working in (expensive to build and maintain) clean-room environments to maximize the probability of your data being recovered. Typically, people don't resort to hard drive recovery services unless the cost of the data loss exceeds the cost of recovery.

...Can I interest you in a backup drive for when this happens again?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Does a keyboard exist with these specs?"

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Corsair's offerings might meet your needs: http://www.corsair.com/en-us/gaming-keyboards

Don't let the "gaming" moniker put you off. Unlike offerings from other companies (coughrazercough), Corsair doesn't require you to login to a cloud account in order to access the keyboard preferences. I have a K95 RGB, and judged purely as a keyboard it's served me quite well.

It doesn't look like they come with PBT caps, but they are offered as an add-on option in both white and black: http://www.corsair.com/en-us/corsair-gaming-pbt-double-shot-keycaps-black

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube